NIH-Related Jobs - United For Medical Research
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NIH-Related Jobs

Lab technicians running Thermo Fisher specialty diagnostic assays to identify and quantify key biomarkers in human serum.

Photo Credit: Image courtesy of Thermo Fisher Scientific

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Saving Lives. Creating Jobs.

Every year the National Institutes of Health funds billions of dollars of research in communities across the country with the aim of saving lives, improving health and offering hope to people touched by disease. This research also helps spur the economy – supporting nearly $74 billion in economic activity and over 433,000 jobs across the United States in 2018 alone.

Learn more about the people and jobs that rely on NIH-funded research.

Romwell reviews incoming biological samples used by NIH supported researchers across the country studying the toxicity, behavioral impact and other health effects of products used by the public.

NIH supports Beau’s study of Alzheimer’s disease and pursuit of treatments at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Justin’s job at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis supports NIH research that aims to prevent childhood malnutrition.

Christie’s work at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, to reveal the causes of childhood leukemia and other cancers, is supported by the NIH.

Calixto provides specialized support in building microfluidic devices to dozens of NIH-funded laboratories across Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA.

Christopher works at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville to ensure the safe use of ionizing radiation and lasers often used in NIH-supported research labs.

The lab at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA where Dante works receives NIH funding to study development of the inner ear and spinal cord.

At BD Biosciences in San Jose, CA Eric works to develop next-generation cell analysis technologies used by scientists worldwide.

Ruchi’s NIH-funded research at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago aims to improve health outcomes for children with food allergies.

Irina facilitates the day-to-day operations of a large and complex department that includes dozens of NIH-funded laboratories at the Stem Cell & Regenerative Biology Department at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA.

At Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Bob oversees safety and compliance, helping NIH-funded researchers conduct both great and safe science.

The facility where Kelsi works at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis receives NIH funding to support the development of personalized breast cancer treatments.

At Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville Kevin and his team work to ensure that chemicals used for research are used, stored, and disposed of safely.

Kristen runs a compliance program for over 20 NIH funded labs and facilities within the Stem Cell & Regenerative Biology Department at Harvard University in Cambridge, MA.

Mary Anna works with researchers in over 20 NIH-funded labs and facilities in Harvard University’s Stem Cell & Regenerative Biology Department to ensure their work complies with regulations and protects human participants.

Patricia reviews incoming biological samples used by NIH supported researchers across the country studying the toxicity, behavioral impact and other health effects of products used by the public.

Robin leads a team at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville that ensures researchers are trained and following protocols for safe and ethical use of biological materials.

NIH funds Emily’s research at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago of older people with exceptional memories, which could lead to a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.

Andrew’s job at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing in Philadelphia supports NIH-funded research to help people recover after traumatic injury.

Shirley manufactures printed vials at Thermo Fisher Scientific in Fairport, NY that are used for cryogenic storage of cell and microbiological cultures, sperm and serum/blood or other biologicals used in research.

Angela works at Tulane University in New Orleans where her job is to ensure that biosafety guidelines are met for all NIH research conducted there using synthetic or recombinant nucleic acid molecules.

Bernard operates and maintains equipment at BD’s high volume manufacturing facility in Sumter, SC, which produces tools used for research and healthcare delivery worldwide, including sharps, rubber stoppers, blood collection devices, plastic components and tubes.

Elijah operates and maintains equipment at BD’s high volume manufacturing facility in Sumter, SC, which produces tools used for research and healthcare delivery worldwide, including sharps, rubber stoppers, blood collection devices, plastic components and tubes.

John oversees the programs at Tulane University aimed at moving promising discoveries and technical developments from research into the marketplace where they can benefit society. 

At the Corning plant in Maine they produce life science products that are used in the development of new drugs and vaccines.

Scott works as a process engineer at Corning’s Kennebunk facility where they manufacture products supporting breakthroughs in cancer treatment, neurological disorders, and other diseases.

Wendy works with principal investigators to prepare and submit grant requests. She helps to manage all financial aspects of grants – from submission through the grant closing.

Rafael and his team ensure that all computer-related activity concerning the administration of our grants, including network storage, security and encryption, fit in with the Johns Hopkins network and are aligned with grantee requirements and other shared resources.

Sue works at Corning’s Kennebunk facility, helping to ensure production of high quality, reliable products that are used every day in hundreds of labs around the world.